2012 Home Renovations – Part 10 – First round of cement pour completed

I took a picture of the signs for the principals on this project, DC Enclosures and DesJoyaux pools.

The site is always organized, even in the midst of rain and the chaos that naturally accompanies any sort of renovation work. At the end of the day everything is wrapped up nicely. Tarps are in place where dirt may be subject to rain , silt fences are set up to prevent mud from traveling and excess erosion, bales of hay keep mud from sliding down the driveway into the street and the work site is free from trash and unnecessary junk. All of the workers have been pleasant to deal with and, most importantly, Michelle feels very comfortable with ALL of the workers. Not only in terms of safety but in terms of competence. Everybody knows what they’re here to do and they do it professionally.

DC Enclosures have done much of the work with respect to the pool installation. They worked on another pool nearby and were suitably impressed with the technology that they have made a point of learning to do the installs under the tutelage of the DesJoyaux folks who have been on site to oversee the pool aspects of the project. DC Enclosure’s role at this point is largely of contractor as they subcontract out tasks that are not their specialties. Their direct participation will again kick into high gear when it comes time to actually construct and assemble the Lanai. I believe much will be constructed off site under more ideal conditions than you find on the job site with final assembly and tweaking being reserved for our back yard.

J&A Concrete, with Stasio leading their efforts, are the ones who have done the all digging and much of the prep work.

Again, I sound like a broken record. But the pile of dirt in front of the house is bigger still! Rich tells us that MANY people are stopping as they drive by in order to ask what is going on. Apparently our project is something of a mini-sensation in the neighborhood.

As expected, things are slowing down a bit now as finer work is being done. Below is work that was done on Day 7. Day 8 consisted of a morning meeting between the major players and decisions being made for the questions that have come up.

Here are the usual Patio views

followed by a peek inside the pool where you can see the floor and walls have been poured

And the overview. If you look to the left of the filter unit, you’ll see two hoses snaking away from the pool wall. These are the hydraulic lines for our fastlane.

And the foundation for the driveway retaining wall

Our original plans were to move our air conditioning condenser unit down the driveway – closer to the front of the house – so that we would not be able to hear it from the lanai and then place the pool heater, Fastlane pump and the Salt system alongside that. The new plan is to drop the condenser unit over on the opposite side of the house and relocate the pool machinery up by our shed and put up a small wall so that it all would not be visible from the lanai. Those changes, plus the increase to the size of the driveway and other decisions made this morning are going to run me about another $10,000+. These are typical of the kinds of things you do when you have a chance to see where you’ve made it so far and then project forward to where you want the final project to be. I’ve been careful to try to limit scope creep. But some things you just cannot resist doing. I’ll be posting a full accounting of this project’s costs at the end much as I did for my major Master Bedroom and house renovations , near the bottom you’ll see a link with a PDF for the project’s costs.

Beyond that, day 8 was relatively short with a bunch of rebar work where cross pieces were attached to the uprights embedded in the retaining wall bases.

2012 Home Renovations – Part 09 – Rebar for the pool and its retaining wall is up

2012 Home Renovations – Part 11 – Second round of cement pour completed

 

Posted under General, On the Home Front

This post was written by Marc
on March 8, 2012 at 9:28 pm

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